Wednesday, 20 August 2014

jewish coins

Trove of Jewish Revolt coins discovered near Jerusalem

Bronze bits minted months before destruction of temple on Tisha B’Av; ‘Judea Capta’ coin found in north in summer excavations

 August 5, 2014, 5:56 pm 
A selection of Jewish Revolt coins found at a Roman-era site outside Jerusalem. (photo credit: Ilan Ben Zion/Times of Israel staff)


Read more: Trove of Jewish Revolt coins discovered near Jerusalem | The Times of Israel http://www.timesofisrael.com/trove-of-jewish-revolt-coins-discovered-near-jerusalem/#ixzz3AtOFM0Yo
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A hoard of coins from the fourth year of the Jewish Revolt against Rome — minted months before the fall of Jerusalem in 70 CE — was found outside the capital and announced by the Israel Antiquities Authority on Tuesday to coincide with the Ninth of Av, the date commemorating the destruction of the Second Temple.

The trove, which consists of 114 bronze coins, was unearthed during the expansion of Route 1, the major highway connecting Jerusalem and Tel Aviv, in February. In the past several months, the IAA team led by Judea District chief archaeologist Pablo Betzer has excavated the remains of a small Roman-era Jewish village near the modern town of Abu Ghosh. Amid the ruins was a broken juglet containing the verdigris-coated coins.

The coins are all of identical size and age, and possibly from the same mint. Their value has yet to be determined, but they are likely quarter or one-eighth shekel bits, Betzer said. They are all marked with the words “For the redemption of Zion” and “Year four,” indicating they were made during the fourth year of the revolt against the Roman Empire, or between spring 69 and spring 70 CE. They are decorated with the Biblical four species — palm, myrtle, citron and willow — and a vessel that may symbolize those used in the temple. The coins are still encrusted in nearly 2,000-year-old dirt and oxidation, and await cleaning and study by IAA specialists.


Read more: Trove of Jewish Revolt coins discovered near Jerusalem | The Times of Israel http://www.timesofisrael.com/trove-of-jewish-revolt-coins-discovered-near-jerusalem/#ixzz3AtOKVo7Y
Follow us: @timesofisrael on Twitter | timesofisrael on Facebook

http://www.timesofisrael.com/trove-of-jewish-revolt-coins-discovered-near-jerusalem/

Wednesday, 9 July 2014

abel beth maacah?


Cornell University professor Lauren Monroe shares an update from the second season of excavation atAbel Beth Maacah, directed by Robert A. Mullins and Nava Panitz-Cohen. Check back with us for more posts on this new excavation project as the season continues.

 
Digs Map 2014 PNSituated at the ancient border between the polities of Israel, Aram and Phoenicia, and the modern countries of Israel, Lebanon and Syria, the large tell of Abel Beth Maacah holds tremendous promise, both for understanding the history of this multi-cultural arena, as well as for refining “Biblical archaeology” methods themselves.
In 2 Samuel 20 Sheba ben Bichri, a Benjaminite, flees to Abel Beth Maacah, seeking refuge from David’s wingman, Joab. As Joab and his army build a siege ramp against the city wall, they are interrupted by the “wise woman of Abel” who admonishes, “They used to say in the old days, ‘Let them inquire at Abel’; and so they would settle a matter. I am one of those who are peaceable and faithful in Israel; you seek to destroy a city that is a mother in Israel; why will you swallow up the heritage of the Lord?” It is clear from her remarks that Abel has an Israelite history and lore that precedes Joab’s time and is otherwise unknown to him. Whereas Joab is a threat to Abel, Sheba legitimately seeks refuge there. In the pro-David, Judahite perspective of the text in its final form, the city’s allegiance goes with Joab and David, with Sheba’s head handed down to Joab from Abel’s ramparts – hardly what one expects from the “peaceful” in Israel.

for the rest of the article, go to the url:

http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/daily/digs-2014/abel-beth-maacah-in-the-bible/

Wednesday, 18 June 2014

were there israelites in the transjordan? asor article

The Land Between The Two Rivers: Early Israelite Identities in Transjordan

June 12, 2014 7:48 am
ANET_June2014_Banner
By: Thomas Petter, Associate Professor at Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary
Were there Israelites in Transjordan in the early Iron Age? How would we know from archaeology? Or if not Israelites (and Moabites), who should we be looking for?
The task of plotting identities in the past is tricky business. It becomes even more problematic when opinions diverge dramatically about the value of artifacts for historical reconstruction. The question is routinely raised regarding the history of early Israel in the southern Levant whether archaeology can recover anything that speaks to identities during the Late Bronze and early Iron I periods. Over half a century of scholarship attests that answers range from a definite “no” to a definite “yes,” with a few shades of “maybe’s” in between. While my book The Land Between the Two Rivers makes an historical claim that there were indeed early Israelites present, on the basis of long term cyclical settlement patterns in central Transjordan, my goal is also to propose a model of tribal ethnic identities that could be flexible enough to be applied to other historical settings.
Map of Transjordan showing sites mentioned in the text. Image courtesy of Thomas Petter.
Map of Transjordan showing sites mentioned in the text. Image courtesy of Thomas Petter.
Mesha Stele.
Mesha Stele.
Tall al-`Umayri fortification wall dating to the Late Bronze/Iron transition. Photo courtesy of Larry Herr and the Madaba Plains Project.
Tall al-`Umayri fortification wall dating to the Late Bronze/Iron transition. Photo courtesy of Larry Herr and the Madaba Plains Project.



http://asorblog.org/?p=7436

Thursday, 12 June 2014

50% discount offer for books from baylor (for short time only)!

STM students, pls take note of this special offer from baylor. offer for a short time only.
when you click on the given link, it will lead you to a window to fill in your details. 
remember to use your stm.edu.my address.
a catalogue will be send to you.
for a sample, see their website: http://www.baylorpress.com/ 
for example, those who wish to work on the hebrew text on some individual OT books, see : http://www.baylorpress.com/en/Subject/11/Hebrew_Language_Studies

________________________________________________________________________________________


Graduate students can get 50% off of everything on our backlist if they sign up with the following link: http://baylorpr.es/1hXvixQ. The only requirement is that they sign up with their “.edu” email address.

Students may sign up through June 12, will be sent a discount code on June 13, and then may place their orders from June 14-18.

50% Discount for Grad Students from Baylor University Press
To participate in their promotion, go to http://baylorpr.es/1hXvixQ and fill out the form. Be sure to use your “.edu” email address.
The discount code for the promotion will then be sent to you on June 14 and applies only to backlist books.



Start shopping at www.baylorpress.com.

Friday, 16 May 2014

Is hanging gardens of babylon in nineveh?

Hanging Gardens of Babylon … in Assyrian Nineveh

Sennacherib’s garden without a rival

“In this palace he erected very high walks, supported by stone pillars; and by planting what was called a pensile paradise, and replenishing it with all sorts of trees, he rendered the prospect an exact resemblance of a mountainous country.”
Josephus, Contra Appion, lib.1. c.19-20 (quoting Berossus).
This Assyrian relief from Nineveh (now housed at the British Museum) shows trees hanging in the air on terraces and plants suspended on stone arches that resemble those from Sennacherib’s waterways, supporting the idea that the Hanging Gardens of Babylon were actually located at Nineveh.
This Assyrian relief from Nineveh (now housed at the British Museum) shows trees hanging in the air on terraces and plants suspended on stone arches that resemble those from Sennacherib’s waterways, supporting the idea of a hanging garden at Nineveh.
At the start of the seventh century B.C.E., the Assyrian king Sennacherib called his new palace at Nineveh a “palace without a rival.” The Hebrew Bible is less kind, describing Nineveh as “that great city with more than 120,000 people who cannot discern between their right hand and their left hand” (Jonah 4:11). Located by modern Mosul in Iraq, Nineveh was undoubtedly the metropolis of its day. Was the construction so extensive as to include one of the Seven Wonders of the World?
Okay, I know what you are thinking. We know where the Seven Wonders were, because the locations are included in their names. The Great Pyramid of Giza. The Temple of Artemis at Ephesus. The Hanging Gardens of Babylon.
Let’s stop at that last one. In the third century B.C.E., Berossus wrote that the Babylonian king Nebuchadnezzar II built the Hanging Gardens almost three hundred years earlier, and his statement was copied by later historians, including Josephus. However, there is no archaeological evidence indicating the presence of massive gardens at Babylon, and while we have hundreds of documents by Nebuchadnezzer describing his building activities, none mention his horticultural pursuits. Who else may have built the legendary gardens?

for the rest of the article, pls refer to the url below:

http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/daily/ancient-cultures/ancient-near-eastern-world/hanging-gardens-of-babylon-in-assyrian-nineveh/