Friday, 21 March 2014

DSS phylacteries


Qumran Phylacteries Reveal Nine New Dead Sea Scrolls

Bible and archaeology news

Yonatan Adler’s work revealed new phylacteries containing unopened tefillin Dead Sea Scrolls texts, confirming a continuity of Jewish practice over the past two millennia. Photo: The Leon Levy Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library
Yonatan Adler’s work revealed new phylacteries containing unopened tefillin Dead Sea Scrolls texts, confirming a continuity of Jewish practice over the past two millennia. Photo: The Leon Levy Dead Sea Scrolls Digital Library
The thousands of fragments of Biblical text that comprise the Dead Sea Scrolls have shed light on the origins of early Christian thought, the development of the Hebrew Bible and the history of Judaic beliefs from the third century B.C.E. to 70 C.E. Often considered the greatest archaeological find of the 20th century, the Dead Sea Scrolls have received intense academic scrutiny by archaeologists, religious scholars and epigraphers alike over the past 60 years. And yet nine small Dead Sea Scroll fragments managed to escape the attention of scholars—until now.
The scroll fragments were hidden in ancient phylacteries, or tefillin, which are small leather boxes containing scripts from the Jewish law that observant Jews wear on the forehead and arm during recitation of certain prayers. Dozens of tefillin scroll fragments containing excerpts from Exodus and Deuteronomy have been uncovered at Qumran, and some of the phylactery texts that have been opened include different spellings from the traditional Biblical text.



http://www.biblicalarchaeology.org/daily/biblical-artifacts/dead-sea-scrolls/qumran-phylacteries-reveal-nine-new-dead-sea-scrolls/

Monday, 17 March 2014

war imposed heavy loss on archaeology

War, the latest visitor to Syria’s fabled Palmyra

MARCH 17, 2014
The ancient oasis city of Palmyra was one of the most important cultural centres of the ancient world, but now bears the scars violence and looting. – AFP pic, March 17, 2014.The ancient oasis city of Palmyra was one of the most important cultural centres of the ancient world, but now bears the scars violence and looting. – AFP pic, March 17, 2014.Syria's fabled desert Greco-Roman oasis of Palmyra saw its last tourist in September 2011, six months after the uprising began. Its most recent visitors are violence and looting.
Ancient Palmyra now bears the scars of modern warfare but also greed in the form of pillaged tombs.
The Unesco-listed "pearl of the desert" world heritage site in Homs province, just over 200km northeast of Damascus, was one of the most important cultural centres of the ancient world.
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