Tuesday, 2 April 2013

city of UR


New Monumental Structure Uncovered Near Ur

Bible and archaeology news

The Standard of Ur
After nearly 80 years, archaeologists have returned to one of the world’s most prolific archaeology sites. While the site was initially excavated in the 1850s, Sir Leonard Woolley’s well-publicized 20th-century excavations exposed valuable artifacts and thousands of years of the Sumerian city-state’s history, spurring on associations with Abraham’s birthplace, the Biblical Ur of the Chaldees.
Archaeologists returning to Iraq have uncovered a massive structure on the ancient banks of the Euphrates River, ten miles from the city center. The recent discovery’s monumental size—with nearly nine-foot-thick walls—suggests that it was a palace or a temple. The team, led by University of Manchester archaeologist Jane Moon, employs techniques not available to Woolley and his team. Moon identified the structure in satellite images, and so far her team has only exposed a small section of the monumental complex. While Woolley’s excavations were famous for producing lavish artifacts including the Standard of Ur (pictured above, right), Moon’s modern archaeological toolkit will allow her team to reconstruct the economy, diet, climate and daily life at the Sumerian capital.

Sunday, 31 March 2013

turin shroud

Archbishop of Turin Cesare Nosiglia, center, kneels in front of the Shroud of Turin that went on display for a special TV appearance Saturday, March 30, 2013. The Shroud went on display amid new research disputing claims it's a medieval fake and purporting to date the linen some say was Jesus' burial cloth to around the time of his death. Pope Francis sent a special video message to the event in Turin's cathedral, but made no claim that the image on the shroud of a man with wounds similar to those suffered by Christ was really that of Jesus. He called the cloth an "icon," not a relic — an important distinction. "This image, impressed upon the cloth, speaks to our heart and moves us to climb the hill of Calvary, to look upon the wood of the Cross, and to immerse ourselves in the eloquent silence of love," he said. (AP Photo/Alessandro Di Marco, Pool)

VATICAN CITY (AP) — The Shroud of Turin went on display for a special TV appearance Saturday amid new research disputing claims it's a medieval fake and purporting to date the linen some say was Jesus' burial cloth to around the time of his death.
Pope Francis sent a special video message to the event in Turin's cathedral, but made no claim that the image on the shroud of a man with wounds similar to those suffered by Christ was really that of Jesus. He called the cloth an "icon," not a relic — an important distinction.
"This image, impressed upon the cloth, speaks to our heart and moves us to climb the hill of Calvary, to look upon the wood of the Cross, and to immerse ourselves in the eloquent silence of love," he said.
"This disfigured face resembles all those faces of men and women marred by a life which does not respect their dignity, by war and violence which afflict the weakest," he said. "And yet, at the same time, the face in the Shroud conveys a great peace; this tortured body expresses a sovereign majesty."
for the rest of article, see url:



http://news.yahoo.com/shroud-turin-goes-display-amid-research-164019211.html

easter sunday litany


easter sunday litany
















a dead man can be held by the chains of death,
strong chains that no one can set himself free.
but a living saviour no chains can hold,
broken and shattered, none can foresee.

the easter story is about an empty tomb,
one which death could not contain.
a triumphant saviour who conquered and arose
death fled, its power broken, now in disdain.

to a woman, the risen Lord first appeared,
to calm her fears and renew her joy.
to those who have not seen yet believe by faith,
is now given a hope nothing can destroy.















anthony loke. easter sunday. 31st march 2013.